Posts Tagged ‘daily goals’

Show Yourself Some Love!

LoveLove… EVERYDAY!

‘Tis the season of love!  The month when we love up on significant others, family members, even pets.  So how about we love up on ourselves a bit too!

I’m not suggesting buying ourselves a five pound chunk of chocolate and breaking off a bite every 15 minutes.  I mean, let’s take a moment to be thankful for our bodies and having the ability to make it better.

In my latest newsletter, I mentioned that I find it very interesting that society puts so much emphasis on one day of the year to show to others how much we love them.  I also correlated that we use the month of January to do the same for our bodies.

Would you agree that love or better health is not going to be had by working on it for just a day or even a month for that matter?  What I’m getting at is this: Our body is our own masterpiece.  It is what we put in it.  Ha!  Literally and figuratively speaking, actually!

That’s a different way to look at it, isn’t it?  Just like a loving relationship, it takes patience and continual work to reap the benefits of a healthy body.  Take this time to put a plan into action on ways to treat your body better.  The benefits are SO worth it!

New Year’s Resolution 2014

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Here’s 2014 and another round of resolutions.  I think mine may sound like a broken record.  Run a half, stay in shape and help others do the same.  Eat as clean as possible and walk my own talk.

I’m going to add one more to that… go on a great vacation.

It’s been a while since my husband and I have gotten out of Dodge.  Whether it’s the mountains or a beach, we will get a break this year.  We need it!

Cheers to a new year!   Better than the last and full of excitement and fantastic experiences for us all!

Holiday Damage Control

The holidays are upon us once more.  There have been plenty of opportunities to jump ship on our health goals. healthy holidays So how do we do damage control before the end of the year and we’re five pounds heavier?

If you’ve already set your routine to help you through the season, stick to it.  If not, here are a few ideas.  Something is better than nothing, just like one pound gained is better than five.

  • Water.  Water.  Water.  Drink it before, during and after your get-togethers.  It will keep you feeling full, hydrated and hopefully not so apt to binge on the tray of sugar and carbohydrates.
  • Eat clean during the week.  No sugar, flour or dairy.  And for good measure no alcohol.   You’ll have plenty of opportunity for that at your gatherings.
  • Eat well before you go to a party.  Get some substance in your belly before you walk in to temptation.
  • Get a move on.  The more you move, the more you lose or keep off.  Take every opportunity for an extra few steps of workouts.
  • Take a dish to a gathering that you feel good eating.  At least you know you’ll have something on your plate that you won’t feel guilty about eating.

Above all, keep calm and stay merry!  The key to beating the emotional eating cycle is keeping your cortisol and glucose levels steady.

One Year Anniversary!

1 year anniv

December 1st marked the official one-year anniversary of Achievable Health.  I swear time can’t go any faster.  It seems as though just yesterday I was sending out my first newsletter and hoping and praying that I had the capability to help clients as much as I thought I was able to.

A few mistakes and a lot of triumphs later I’m still going at it and loving every minute of the journey.  Who knows what will happen from now until the next anniversary.  I hope for many more great relationships built and wonderful experiences to enjoy.  What a great blessing this has been!

Roasted Root Vegetables

How about another great recipe!

It’s the time of year when we need great recipe ideas so here’s a follow-up to yummy beets.

Roasted Root Vegetables root vegetables

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds root vegetables (use potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, beets), peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and cut into 1/3-inch wedges
  • 2  tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • ½  head garlic, separated into cloves peeled and rough chopped
  • Chopped fresh herbs like rosemary and thyme
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Place the root vegetables and onion in a roasting pan.
  2. Toss all ingredients BUT the garlic with the olive oil and maple syrup then salt and pepper to taste. Do not crowd the vegetables.
  3. Roast the mixture for a total of 45-50 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. After 30 minutes, scatter the garlic in with the vegetables. Continue stirring every 15 minutes until the vegetables are tender and evenly browned.
  4. Before serving, add a sprinkling of fresh chopped herbs for garnish.

Balance

Are there any Professional Life Balancers out there?  Get in touch with me, I need some help!  Anybody else feel like they need some help in this department?

Of course, if there were Professional Life Balancers out there for hire, I’m sure they would recommend time management, goal setting and learning to say no as part of their words of wisdom.  What other advice could you give from experience?

Balance

These words of wisdom can be shifted to many parts of our lives, I’m sure.  Think about where your balance is off in your life.  Can any of those recommendations be applied in that situation?

I’m no Professional Life Balancer but I can tell you one thing that gets me through the tough days… knowing that today is today and tomorrow is tomorrow.  Be grateful for today and plan for tomorrow.

Portion Control

Anyone who is trying to watch their weight will tell you that portion control is one of their best allies.  But what is portion control?rasp

By definition: Portion control is understanding how much a serving size of food is and how many calories or how much food energy a serving contains.

It’s very evident that the American diet no longer consists of true portions.  A perfect example would be an order of pasta.  Today’s average serving is enough to fill a 10 to 12 inch plate or bowl.  Even just 10 to 15 years ago, the same order would be equivalent to a side order portion today.

Also consider that it’s not just at a restaurant or at home that portions can sneak up on you.  When you read labels and see the information given, make sure to look at the serving size and how many servings are in the container.  It might say it’s only 50 calories in a serving but there may be 2 to 3 servings per container.

Some people find that actual measurements help keep them in line where others prefer a visual to compare to.  I’ve put together a list of both measurements and visuals to help guide you to better portion control.

Of course these examples are just averages.  For more accurate readings use a calibrated kitchen scale (I purchased a cheap one at Target) or measuring cups and spoons.

  • Fist = 1 Cup of rice, pasta, fruit or veggies
  • Palm = 3 ounces of meat, fish or poultry
  • Handful = 1 ounce of nuts, seeds or raisins
  • Thumb = 1 ounce of hard cheese or nut butter
  • Thumb tip = 1 teaspoon of oil, butter or sugar
Other serving size references:

1 serving:

  • 1/2 cup, cooked pasta
  • 1/2 cup mashed potatoes
  • 1/2 cup cooked vegetables
  • 1 cup ( 4 leaves) lettuce
  • 1 medium apple
  • 1/2 grapefruit
  • 1/2 mango
  • 1/2 cup berries
  • 1 cup yogurt or milk
  • 1 1/2 ounces of cheddar cheese
  • 1 small chicken breast
  • 1/4 pound hamburger patty

Hydration

drinking-water If I could ask my clients to make one change to their lifestyle, do you know what I would suggest?

Although all small changes really do have an impact on your health, there is one thing in particular that I think EVERYONE could work on…HYDRATION.

Did you know that the average human body is made up of 60% water?  That’s a lot of water!  And consider this; as stated on About.com, “People feel thirsty when they have already lost around 2-3% of their body’s water.  Mental performance and physical coordination start to become impaired before thirst kicks in, typically around 1% dehydration.”

It is thought that nearly 75% of Americans are dehydrated on a daily occurrence.  This can lead to many side effects, including:

  • Mood change
  • Exhaustion
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Palpations
  • Inability to sweat

By observing the slightest changes in your body, you can beat dehydration before it reaches impairment levels.  These are symptoms to be aware of:

  • Dry, sticky mouth
  • Sleepiness or tiredness — children are likely to be less active than usual
  • Thirst
  • Decreased urine output — no wet diapers for three hours for infants and eight hours or more without urination for older children and teens
  • Few or no tears when crying
  • Dry skin
  • Headache
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness or light-headedness

Lack of hydration is an easy issue to remedy.   Drink more water!  Not pop or most teas and juices, plain water.  Of course, you could always seep cucumber, berries or herbs in your water.  As long as it is high quality, filtered water.

That is where the easy answer ends.  In research, there are many equations and guidelines mentioned as to how much of it to drink.  I found this website questionnaire to be the most precise.

How Much Water Do You Need?

After going through and answering all of the questions it brought me to an answer that is the same as I would have gotten by just following this advice.

Take your weight, divide it by two, and that is the amount in ounces that you should be drinking per day.

Dehydration leads to a slew of physical and mental impairments.  Let’s take an easy preventative step and work on staying hydrated.  Have a water bottle with you at all times.  Soon enough it will be a habit!

Information Session in Ankeny

Round Two – Information Session at Back to Wellness Chiropractic in Ankeny

Well, the first round didn’t kill me so how about a round two!  I may just start to like doing these 😉

Session #2 Marketing Poster for B2W - Copy

Do You Know What You’re Eating?

plums There is something to be said about turning a blind eye and staying naïve to keep a positive attitude.   I have just one problem with that… I’m too inquisitive!

So I’m walking along the produce isles, taking in the beautiful array of colors in front of me.  But then my curiosity and slight OCD take over and I start thinking about how many other hands have touched the same apple and cucumber that I just picked up.  That’s where it all starts…

Here’s some thought provoking information about the produce you buy.

Did you know that most of the produce that you buy at a grocery store could have been harvested weeks and months if not almost a year ago?

It is a common practice for most produce to be harvested early and finished with a chemical spray called ethylene gaswhile in transit.  Yes, produce does emit ethylene naturally while ripening.  But, chemists have taken this natural gas and turned it into a liquid form to spray on early harvested produce.  It is in this form that it’s harmful to us.

Did you know that even some organic apples have a wax coating on them?

This is where it gets tricky.  Many would say that wax has no place being on food.  But consider that some produce naturally has a coating or “wax” on it to help protect it and keep it moist.  The most common types of wax are actually a derivative of animals, minerals or vegetables.  So now it becomes a matter of choice.

Or, how about the fact that produce is handled by many sets of hands that may or may not have been washed after their last trip to the bathroom.

Enough said.

Needless to say, by thinking that buying organic will solve all of the chemical and bacterial issues that consumers need to be aware of is just not going to cut it.  Best bet, by local and in season.  Then, when you get your produce home and begin to prepare it, follow these guidelines to prevent as much chemical and bacterial contamination as much as possible.

  • Soak produce in a 5:1 water to white vinegar ratio for about two minutes
  • For denser produce, scrub the outsides with your hands or a clean cloth
  • Drain and rinse for a good 30 seconds to a minute in clean, running water
  • Store in a clean container different than the one it came home in

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